Symposium présenté dans le cadre de la 10e biennale de l’ARIS, Lille, France


The TPSR model’s contribution to participants’ responsibility development: Research-based practices in various settings. 

 La contribution du modèle Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility (TPSR) à la responsabilisation des pratiquants en activité physique : des pratiques basées sur la recherche dans divers milieux.

Ce symposium a été présenté dans le cadre de la 10e biennale de l’ARIS (Association sur la recherche sur l’intervention en sport) qui a eu lieu à Lille en France du 19 au 21 juin 2018. Six présentations ont été réalisées par des conférenciers de quatre pays : Nouvelle-Zélande, Espagne, Canada, États-Unis.

Organisateurs

Beaudoin, Sylvie
Université de Sherbrooke, Québec, CANADA
Membre régulière du CRIFPE

Doolittle, Sarah
Adelphi University, New York, USA

Fortin-Suzuki, Seira
Université de Sherbrooke, Québec, CANADA
Membre étudiant du CRIFPE

Résumé du symposium et de la présentation # 1

Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility – TPSR (Hellison, 1978; 2011) is a well-known and internationally recognized instructional model that promotes learning about personal and social responsibility through physical activity. A growing body of research has been conducted on the application of the TPSR model in various settings, including sports-based, physical activity and health and physical education programs. The purpose of this symposium is to present several applications of the TPSR model in various settings. The examples shared in this symposium will provide some research-based best practices regarding how to help participants become responsible, what are the underlying processes, and how can educators, teachers, coaches teach responsibility in various settings.

Présentation #1 

Beaudoin, Sylvie, Université de Sherbrooke, Québec, CANADA, Membre régulière du CRIFPE
Doolittle, Sarah, Adelphi University, New York, USA
Fortin-Suzuki, Seira, Université de Sherbrooke, Québec, CANADA, Membre étudiant du CRIFPE

Vidéo: The TPSR model’s contribution to participants’ responsibility development: Research-based practices in various settings. 

Présentation #2 

Fortin-Suzuki, Seira, Université de Sherbrooke (CANADA), Membre étudiant du CRIFPE
Beaudoin, Sylvie, Université de Sherbrooke, Québec, CANADA, Membre régulière du CRIFPE
Desbiens, Jean-François, Université de Sherbrooke (CANADA), Membre régulier du CRIFPE
Wright, Paul M., Northern Illinois University (USA)

Vidéo: Shedding light on the “R” of TPSR: An analysis of the conceptual underpinnings of responsibility within the Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility model

The Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility (TPSR) model is a renowned approach of teaching personal and social responsibility through physical activity (Hellison, 2011). Although numerous empirical studies have demonstrated the model’s practical effectiveness, few scholars have analysed the conceptual underpinnings of the construct of responsibility in TPSR. This presentation demonstrates how responsibility, as viewed in TPSR, is anchored in a humanistic conceptualization of responsibility. A content analysis of 12 texts from French, German and English scholars reveals that responsibility can serve as a beacon to guide human actions. We are responsible towards the Other (the living, myself included) and responsible in the name of its wellbeing. The TPSR model’s values being in sync with this conceptualization brings to light and strengthens its theoretical foundations. This conceptual connection helps to clarify the processes through which one develops responsibility through TPSR.

Présentation #3 

Gordon, Barrie, Victoria University of Wellington (NEW ZEALAND)
Wright, Paul M., Northern Illinois University (USA)
Hemphill, Michael, University of North Carolina at Greensboro (USA)

Vidéo: Developing Positive Values Through Boxing

This presentation reports on an evaluation of three positive youth development based New Zealand boxing academies. The Billy Graham boxing academies are values-based programmes intending to develop character and teach life skills through the context of boxing. The evaluation found there was a clear focus on values as opposed to competitive boxing and that the academies demonstrated success at multiple levels. These included developing fitness, new friendships and increasing self-confidence. Longer term many people reported that the lessons learned through participation had helped participants break free from negative cycles of behaviour allowing them to enjoy more positive life outcomes. The academies were highly regarded by the communities in which they were situated and by the New Zealand police. The presentation will conclude with a discussion on ways in which the academies can build on the current foundation.

Présentation #4 

Dunn, Robin J., Saint Mary’s College of California (USA)

 Vidéo: Fostering responsible behaviors in young children using cooperative activities

The Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility (TPSR) is a common curricular model utilized in after school programs (Hellison, 2011) to promote positive youth development. It has been implemented using a variety of activities.  However, there has been limited research combining TPSR and cooperative activities, which are designed to create community in a non-competitive, safe space (Frank, 2004). There is a strong alignment between core values of cooperative activities and TPSR.  A TPSR-based cooperative activity program strives to engage children in useful, structured activities that promote positive communication, respect, teamwork, and overall pro-social behaviors (Dunn, 2012).  This combined program was implemented with 2nd and 3rd grade students and assisted children in better understanding respect, effort, self-direction, leadership, and helping others by the end of the short eight week program.

Présentation #5 

Escartí, Amparo, University of Valencia (SPAIN)
Pascual, Carmina, University of Valencia (SPAIN)
Carreres,  Federico, University of Alicante (SPAIN)

Vidéo: Applying and Evaluating the Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility Model (TPSR) in Spanish school’s context

The Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility model (TPSR) was proposed by Hellison (1978; 2003) to offer child at risk of social exclusion the opportunity to develop their personal and social skills. This study analyzes the application of personal and social responsibility (TPSR) model to physical education classes in Spanish school context. The participants were students between 8 and 16 (years old) (mean=11.97, standard deviation=2.116). The intervention group was 250 students between 8 and 16 years old (mean =12.13, standard deviation = 2.15) (108 females and 142 males). The comparison group was 245 students between 8 and 16 years old (M = 11.80, SD = 2.06) (112 females and 133 males).  The results show a significant increase in social responsibility, self-efficacy, prosocial behavior of intervention group participants.

Présentation #6 

Martinek, Tom, University of North Carolina at Greensboro (USA)

Vidéo:  Project Effort Youth Leader Corps:  Creating Responsible Leaders through Values-based Learning

This proposal provides a description of an after-school program called the Project Effort Youth Leader Corps. Guided by the Hellison’s Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility Model (TPSR) the program is now in its twenty-fifth year of operation. The proposal includes a description of how the Project Effort Youth Leader Corps got started and how it has evolved over the years. Three aspects of the Project Effort Youth Leader Corps program are portrayed. One is the Project Effort sport club where values-based experiences are taught to underserved children and youth. The second aspect is the Youth Leader Corps where high school youth plan and teach TPSR-based physical activity experiences to underserved children from the local community. The final aspect of this proposal is a profile of some of the research that has emerged from these programs.